Recipes for Wind Patterns

During the fall and winter months, our bodies can become more susceptible to the exogenous elemental factors that can cause us to become ill. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, a common cold is most often classified as wind cold or wind heat.

This usually happens in cold season. A Patient has symptoms like a chill and slight fever, no perspiration, aching all over the body, stuffy and runny nose, scratchy throat, and coughing with thin white phlegm. In this case, food that dispels wind and warms the body should be included in the patient’s diet.

 

Here is an example of a recipe taught at MCOM for a wind cold pattern:

Ginger tea

Ingredients:

  • 15g fresh ginger
  • Scallions to taste
  • Brown sugar to taste

Directions:

  1. Clean and slice the ginger thinly.
  2. Only use the white base of the scallions. Clean and chop this portion of the scallion.
  3. Add 2½ cups of water to a pot and bring to a boil.
  4. Add ginger and scallions and cook for 10 minutes.
  5. Stir in brown sugar.
  6. Let cool before tasting.

Indications:

Ginger is warm in nature. It dispels wind, warms the stomach and also reduces nausea.

Scallion is also warm in nature and it induces sweating.

Note:

Drink one cup of the warm tea. After you have finished, cover your body with a thick blanket to induce sweating. Sweating helps reduce the external pathogen.

 

Here is an example of a recipe taught at MCOM for a wind heat pattern:

Porridge with fresh peppermint leaves

Ingredients:

  • 30g peppermint leaves (can be replaced with 15g dry peppermint leaves if fresh ones are not available)
  • 1/2 cup uncooked brown rice
  • 5 cups water

Directions:

  1. Clean the ingredients.
  2. Cook the rice porridge first.
    1. Add rice and 5 cups water together in a pot
    2. Bring water to boil
    3. Reduce heat to bring the boil to a simmer
    4. Stir occasionally to prevent the rice from sticking to the bottom on the pan
    5. Cook until the rice resembles loose rice pudding or oatmeal. This usually takes 40 minutes to an hour.
  3. Add peppermint leaves 5 minutes before the rice porridge is done.

Indications:

Peppermint is cooling. It dispels wind heat and eases the throat. This is a great meal to tonify the spleen and strengthen our defensive Qi.

Note:

Eat porridge when it is slightly cooled.

About the Author:

Midwest College of Oriental Medicine. Articles that are relevant to the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Oriental Medicine, Acupuncture and Herbs are shared as well as papers and articles written by MCOM graduates, current students, and faculty. Questions and concerns should be directed to mwcpublicist@aol.com